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Boeing drops 767-200ER and 767-400ER, launches 767-2CFX in latest pricing update

by Vinay Bhaskara

A 767-300F – Image Credit: Boeing

American aircraft manufacturer Boeing has released its latest aircraft pricing update, and there were several changes made. Firstly, the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) has dropped the 767-200ER and 767-400ER variants from its 767 product line. These aircraft can no longer be purchased by customers, though if a sizable enough order comes through for Boeing, they could easily re-start production, unlike the 757, whose production line has been retooled for the 737.

The 767-200ER was among the first 767 aircraft offered by Boeing, launching in 1982, the year its standard range cousin, the 767-200, entered service. Ethiopian Airlines was the launch customer for the type in December 1982. Over the years, the smaller 767-200ER was rapidly eclipsed by the larger 767-300 variant, which became the dominant variant in the overall program with 807 ordered (out of 1108 program wide) as of the June Boeing orders and deliveries (also O&D) spreadsheet. Overall, 121 767-200ERs were ordered and delivered, and 39 remain in passenger service. American Airlines is the largest operator with 12 in its fleet used on premium transcontinental routes within the US, though these aircraft will be retired quickly as American takes delivery of their replacement; the Airbus A321.

The 767-400ER was a bit more of an oddball, with only 2 operators (Delta Air Lines, and Continental Airlines – now United Airlines) ordering a total of 38 aircraft. Delta currently has 21 767-400ERs in its fleet, though some of these aircraft may be eventually replaced with the carrier’s recent order for 10 additional Airbus A330-300s, while United has 16 frames remaining. The 767-400ER was designed to compete with the aforementioned A330-300, but largely failed to do so, with the A330-300 having won 635 orders over the course of its lifetime.

The 767 program itself had a seemingly bleak future as recently as 3 years ago, with orders slowing to a crawl (primarily existing 767 operators such as ANA and LAN ordering the 767-300ER as interim lift due to the 787 delays). But in February 2011, Boeing won a landmark aerial refueling tanker deal from the United States Air Force, worth nearly $30 billion over the contract’s lifetime, with a design based around the 767 called the KC-46A. This made it possible for Boeing to extend the life cycle of the commercial variants of the 767, winning further orders, most notably for 46 767-300Fs from FedEx in 2011-12.

Interestingly, the commercial version of the KC-46A, the 767-2CFX has been added to the pricing table, though no price has been set for the aircraft yet. The table with updated prices from Boeing can be seen below. Interestingly, despite Lufthansa’s order for 34 777X family (777-9) aircraft announced today, the type has not yet been formally launched. In all likelihood, formal launch will occur at this years Dubai Air Show, alongside a massive order from Emirates.

Aircraft
Price ($ million)
737
737-700
76.0
737-800
90.5
737-900ER
96.1
737 MAX 7
85.1
737 MAX 8
103.7
737 MAX 9
109.9
747
747-8i
356.9
747-8F
357.5
767
767-300ER
185.8
767-300F
188.0
767-2CFX
TBD
777
777-200ER
261.5
777-200LR
296.0
777-300ER
320.2
777F
300.5
787
787-8
211.8
787-9
249.5
787-10
288.7

About Vinay Bhaskara

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