Friday , 6 December 2019
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Q.E.D. – Wrong security stamps on boarding passes

Last week I had discussed the need to review the requirement of Indian aviation security agencies of placing a stamp on boarding passes and hand luggage tags.

Many readers have commented about similar experiences and the frivolity of having such an archaic system which has become irrelevant in a modern world where threats are more insidious and require ever increasing levels of alertness from our security agencies.

To demonstrate how insignificant, security agencies treat the information on the stamp, a Bangalore Aviation reader sent in this picture.


Do you see the error?

The reader has travelled on April 8th, but the security stamp is dated April 18th — six days in the future as of today. (Editors note: for privacy reasons the seat number, passenger name and airline sequence number have been erased)

The passenger travelled without a hitch, thank you. It appears that the CISF guard at the boarding gate was only concerned that a stamp was applied, and not with the accuracy of the stamp.

So what is preventing a terrorist from bypassing the security and attaching a hand-baggage tag which was stamped earlier?

Bengaluru International Airport has a very strong and fool-proof security system. If the security system is fool-proof and a person cannot bypass the security, then why need the stamp?

Quod Erat Demonstratum(QED).

It is time for the Bureau of Civil Aviation Security to encourage airports which invest in security by removing archaic rules to help them improve efficiency and become role models for those that have not.

About Devesh Agarwal

A electronics and automotive product management, marketing and branding expert, he was awarded a silver medal at the Lockheed Martin innovation competition 2010. He is ranked 6th on Mashable's list of aviation pros on Twitter and in addition to Bangalore Aviation, he has contributed to leading publications like Aviation Week, Conde Nast Traveller India, The Economic Times, and The Mint (a Wall Street Journal content partner). He remains a frequent flier and shares the good, the bad, and the ugly about the Indian aviation industry without fear or favour.

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